Preserved vs. Repressed Sexuality

Sex plays such a dominate role in our culture. It drives our advertising and our entertainment. Whether it’s overt or subtle, it seems to be everywhere.

Question: How do we deal with this as followers of Jesus? How do we participate in this sex saturated culture and yet live differently? What boundaries do we place in our lives?

And possibly even more important…how do we guide our children and our single adults through this extremely difficult maze? This is a question we really need to spend some time on. What we teach here really matters. It will influence not only their actions but their hearts. It could directly impact whether they receive the gift of sex truly as a gift or as something else entirely.

Last week, I ran across a tremendous post about this. It directly addresses how so much of our Christian community has dealt with sexuality and the potential struggles we create within the hearts of our children and single adults. Take a look, it’ll be well worth your time!

Preserved vs. Repressed Sexuality.

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Jacob’s Dream…Our Reality!

A few years ago, Abilene Christian University commissioned this sculpture to be constructed just outside of their School of Theology building, called “Jacob’s Dream.” It depicts the dream Jacob (Abraham’s grandson) had in Genesis 28, where he saw a stairway reaching from earth to heaven and angels climbing up and down on it. It was in this moment that God reconfirmed the promises he made to Abraham…to give his descendants the land he was on…to multiply his descendants like the dust on the earth…that all the peoples of the earth will be blessed through him…and that God will not leave him.

What an incredible story! What would it do to someone to see a glimpse of the eternal so clearly? And to hear the voice of God, loving you and promising to use you to bless the entire world! How would it change the way you would think of God? See the world? See people? Could you ever go back to the way things were?

The two girls standing underneath the ladder are my daughter, Reagan, and her friend, Sidney. They were just finishing their week of camp at ACU and had to have one more look at the sculpture. They had an amazing time and shared their experiences with — well — enthusiasm. They told us about their friends and all the fun they had. Then they talked to us about God, his promise to come back and that he will recreate a place for us to live with him forever. As they talked, I couldn’t help thinking that we were, in that moment, experiencing some of God’s promises spoken during Jacob’s dream. That these two beautiful little girls have received a taste of the kingdom of God!

In the camp’s closing ceremony, they showed a camp video for the parents to enjoy. Then, in their final act of camp, they asked all the students to stand and repeat a pledge that grew out of their week. It was a tremendous site, seeing a couple hundred elementary students declaring who they intend to be as they participate in the Father’s kingdom.

Here is that pledge. As you read it, consider how different our experience in this life would be if we commit to living this way with every breath we take. If we declare that we have encountered the God of Jacob, been invited into his kingdom and there is no turning back!

Kingdom of God Pledge

Because I have been invited into the throne room of God

Because I have been adopted into the family of God

Because I want to be a citizen of the Kingdom of heaven forever

I hereby renounce any allegiance to the kingdom of earth

and any other god other than the One True God who created me and loves me.

I hereby declare that it is my heart’s desire to do God’s will on earth

just as it is done in heaven

So I will work to heal those who need healing

I will seek to know God’s will and obey it

And I will seek to fight injustice wherever I encounter it

Until God calls me home or Jesus returns to take us all home to heaven.

To the glory of God the Father. Amen.

Do You Want to Make a Differnce or a Point? – by Pete Wilson

Hey Guys! I was reading Pete Wilson’s blog (author of Plan B and Empty Promises) a couple days ago and really enjoyed this post. I love his thoughts about making a difference instead of making a point! It reminds me of a life-changing and ministry-chaning struggle I went through a dozen years ago as I wrestled with the difference between success and significance. It doesn’t always come with applause but I want to position myself to choose significance and faithfulness. Take a look at what Pete wrote…

Do You Want To Make A Difference Or A Point?

July 2, 2012 in Leadership with 33 Comments

There’s an article in the July issue of Church Executive that just came out last week entitled “Who Speaks Up?” I was skimming the article nodding along with most of what the author was saying until I saw my name. Then all of the sudden it became personal and I stopped to reflect.

Ron Keener wrote,

“I have to wonder: Who speaks for the church now? Billy Graham is 94 in November and we miss his presence in the pulpit. Franklin Graham has a strong message but his attention is rightfully overseas and focused on the parachurch.

When CNN’s Larry King wanted a point of view from the evangelical church he went to Jerry Falwell or Pat Robertson, as if either of them really spoke for the church-at-large. Occasionally John McArthur, now 72, showed up at the “Kings Table,” and one or two other well-known preachers.

Many of the best speakers for the faith, and for the church in the world, keep busy with their own congregations and avoid the national media scene. Chuck Smith Sr. is 84 and ailing. Charles Stanley is 80. Chuck Swindoll and Jack Hayford were born in 1934.

He continues,

“Where are the “young bucks” within the church who bring it fresh thinking? And I don’t mean universalist Rob Bell. Such as David Platt, Pete Wilson, Mark Batterson, Randy Frazee or Rick Rusaw? They are so silent.

The church is under attack like no other time, and if responsible church men and women don’t speak up on its behalf int these turbulent social and cultural times, other, not so well meaning, will.

I appreciate Ron Keener and his concern even if he did somewhat call me out. :) I understand what’s he’s saying and he asks some valid questions.

Here’s my thoughts on this.

I’ve never felt called or led to be a talking head for the evangelical church. My understanding is that talking heads make points. I don’t want my life and ministry to be about making points.

To borrow a line from Andy Stanley, “I rather make a difference than a point“.

Sure, I can go on television and make some “points”, maybe  gain a few fans, get the applause of some church people. But in the process I alienate the very people that are far from God who I want to reach through my ministry.

Maybe it’s just me, but I’ve seen very few lives changes with preachers engaging the media and making very well crafted points. I’m not sure anyone cares about our points. I’m afraid that in making our points we forget about the very people we’re trying to reach with our points.  There’s nothing wrong with making points, I just think we might have a greater calling.

I’ll make some points in a message.

I’ll make some points in my books.

Along the way I hope some of my points may make you think, question, or even take action.

But more than anything. I want my life and ministry to be focused on making a difference.

So if the evangelical church is looking for a talking head that will cruise the media circuits trying to make points… I think I’ll pass.

If the evangelical church is looking for some pastors that want to go out and make a point by first making a difference… then you can count me in.

*If you’d like to visit Pete’s blog and see the original post, just click the link below:

http://withoutwax.tv/2012/07/02/do-you-want-to-make-a-difference-or-a-point 

Running – by Sue Wells

Here’s a post from my precious friend Sue Wells. Take a look, it’s well worth it!

Sue – Keep running with the Father. And oh, how I miss running right next to you!

awellrunsdeep

  • Let me start by saying that I am not a runner, nor do I have any desire to be a runner.  I can only image what is to be a runner and how I might feel if I ran.

I start the marathon with such exuberance, I feel rested, I feel strong, I feel good.  I am ready to conquer the course.

“Racers ready, Set” the pistol goes off, “Go”.

I am off I start at a good steady pace.  Hearing the pounding of the other runners feet hit the ground gives me power and a rhythm to which I can set my pace.  One mile, two miles, five miles, ten miles.  I begin to feel the muscles in my body warm, my breathing is a little harder.  I hear less of the rhythm of running feet.  As I run the course what I was counting on to help me…

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